Managing Your Cast of Characters

This one is a bit short, as there isn’t too much to say on the topic. Well, okay, there is. But saying it all would be long-winded and  better suited to a book about writing rather than a blog. Instead, I’ll just hit the highlights.

Sometimes in a story, the main character or characters come to us. Other times, we must seek them out. Whatever the process of arrival into the story, one thing I’ve learned over the years is when to take a hard look at the cast and decide when I’ve got too many running around. Continue reading…

Writing Style

Every writer has certain themes or ideas that seem to permeate their writing. For Stephen King it’s the small town thrown into whatever supernatural mystery or horror of the story. For Roger Zelazny it was using pieces of various mythologies in new ways.

For me it’s usually been conspiracy theories or off-the-wall beliefs. I’ve realized over the years that the possibility of an ancient Atlantean society having existed seems to occur in a lot of setting back-stories. The way it appears or influences things varies widely between the works, but I have noticed that it seems to be a common theme for me. Continue reading…

Character Development

Before I start, comments should now be turned on for entries. I hadn’t realized they were inactive.

I’ve been writing in one medium or another for over two decades, and each time a story idea presents itself to me, it always begins with a character or set of characters. I’ve been thinking about that process a lot over the past several days as I prepared to write this entry, and I can’t honestly recall a story where a situation presented itself and then I had to find a character for it. The ideas have always come to me with a character in tow. Continue reading…

A Typical Writing Day

Most professional writers will tell you to write something everyday, and that’s very sound advice. It not only keeps the work moving forward, but keeps the writing muscles exercised. It also prevents one from missing a day, two days, or more, and then struggling to get back into the flow.

I usually stick to that advice. I’ve been writing for quite a while, though, and whether or not I actually write everyday depends on what I am working on at the time. If I am involved in a fiction piece, I plan on at least some time at the keyboard on a daily basis. For setting and character design, I tend to do a 5-day work week, instead. I’ll take Saturday and Sunday off. Continue reading…